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Southern Altai

[aka Altai Kalmuck, Oirot, южноалтайский язык]

Classification: Turkic

·

threatened

Description Resources Activity Revitalization Bibliography Suggest a ChangeLanguage metadata

Altai Kalmuck, Oirot, южноалтайский язык, алтай тили, Oyrot, Altai

Turkic, South Siberian

ISO 639-3

alt

As

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Language information by source

Information from: “UNESCO RED BOOK ON ENDANGERED LANGUAGES: NORTHEAST ASIA” . Juha Janhunen; Tapani Salminen (2000)

Threatened
80 percent certain, based on the evidence available<20,000Native speakers worldwideEthnic population

40,000

DATE OF INFO1993SPEAKER NUMBER TRENDS TRANSMISSION OTHER LANGUAGES USED BY THE COMMUNITY

Russian

LANGUAGE CONTEXT COMMENTS

Under increasing interference from Russian, the universal second language of the speakers; triggered by both social and ecological problems, there is, however, a current rise of nationalism, which may improve the position of the native language

PLACESRussiaLOCATION DESCRIPTION

in the central and southwestern river valleys of the Altai region (Russian Altai), mainly within the Altai (Gorno-Altai) Republic, southern Siberia

Information from: “The Red Book of the Peoples of the Russian Empire” . Andrew Humphreys and Krista Mits ·

Vulnerable 20 percent certain, based on the evidence available53,220Native speakers worldwideEthnic population

60,000

MORE ON SPEAKER NUMBERS

Source: According to the 1959 census the Altaics numbered either 44,654 or 45,300 (according to different sources), 88.7 %% of whom were native speakers. According to the 1979 census data the total number of Altaics was approximately 60,000 of whom 50,203 lived in the autonomous region.

DATE OF INFO1979Scripts (Writing system)Cyrillic alphabet

Information from: “Europe and North Asia” (211-282) . Tapani Salminen (2007) , C. Moseley · London & New York: Routledge

Threatened 80 percent certain, based on the evidence available61,000Native speakers worldwideMORE ON SPEAKER NUMBERS

Combined figure of both Southern and Northern Altay.

DATE OF INFO1989SPEAKER NUMBER TRENDS TRANSMISSION LANGUAGE CONTEXT COMMENTS

There is currently a rise of nationalism,
which may improve the position of the native language. The speakers of Teleut, in particular, have recently shown interest in national renaissance, which might lead to the revigoration of the native language.

PLACESSiberiaLOCATION DESCRIPTION

Spoken in the central and southwestern river valleys of the Altay area in southern Siberia.

Information from: “World Oral Literature Project” .

Vulnerable 20 percent certain, based on the evidence available20,000Native speakers worldwide

Information from: “The World Atlas of Language Structures” . Bernard Comrie and David Gil and Martin Haspelmath and Matthew S. Dryer · Oxford University Press

Information from: “Ethnologue: Languages of the World, 16th Edition (2009)” . M. Paul Lewis · SIL International

Vulnerable 20 percent certain, based on the evidence available20,000Native speakers worldwideEthnic population

67,239

MORE ON SPEAKER NUMBERS

Data for the number of native speakers comes from (1993 J. Janhunen). Data for the ethnic population includes "Northern Altai [atv] but excluding 2,399 Talangits and 2,650 Teleuts, 2002 census."

PLACESRussia;

Information from: “Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger” . Christopher Moseley (ed.) (2010) UNESCO Publishing

Vulnerable 20 percent certain, based on the evidence available50,000Native speakers worldwideDiscussionPlease enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus. comments powered by Disqus LOCATION INFORMATION

Information from: “The World Atlas of Language Structures” . Bernard Comrie and David Gil and Martin Haspelmath and Matthew S. Dryer · Oxford University Press

Information from: “Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger” . Christopher Moseley (ed.) (2010) UNESCO Publishing

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Sources
Isbn Series Month Edition Num Year Title Booktitle Pages Note Editor Howpublished Publisher Journal Volume Address Institution Chapter Translator School Url Author Free Text Citation Copied From Older Adults Ethnic Population Young Adults Private Comment Speaker Number Text Date Of Info Speaker Number Public Comment Semi Speakers Elders Second Language Speakers Domains Other Langs Other Languages Used Private Comment Government Support Speaker Attitude Public Comment Institutional Support Number Speaker Other Languages Endangerment Level Transmission Private Comment Public Comment Domains Of Use Speaker Number Trends Private Comment Public Comment Places Description Coordinates

SOURCE: “Europe and North Asia” (211-282) . Tapani Salminen (2007) , C. Moseley · London & New York: Routledge

SOURCE: “The World Atlas of Language Structures” . , Bernard Comrie and David Gil and Martin Haspelmath and Matthew S. Dryer · Oxford University Press

SOURCE: “Ethnologue: Languages of the World, 16th Edition (2009)” . , M. Paul Lewis · SIL International

SOURCE: “Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger” . Christopher Moseley (ed.) (2010) UNESCO Publishing

SOURCE: “UNESCO RED BOOK ON ENDANGERED LANGUAGES: NORTHEAST ASIA” . Juha Janhunen; Tapani Salminen (2000)

SOURCE: “World Oral Literature Project” .

SOURCE: “The Red Book of the Peoples of the Russian Empire” . , Andrew Humphreys and Krista Mits ·

2007 Europe and North Asia Encyclopedia of the World's Endangered Languages 211-282 C. Moseley London & New York: Routledge Tapani Salminen Salminen, Tapani. 2007. "Europe and North Asia." In Encyclopedia of the World's Endangered Languages, edited by C. Moseley. 211-282. London & New York: Routledge. HHOLD 61,000 1989 10000-99999 Combined figure of both Southern and Northern Altay. There is currently a rise of nationalism, which may improve the position of the native language. The speakers of Teleut, in particular, have recently shown interest in national renaissance, which might lead to the revigoration of the native language. Threatened (80 percent certain, based on the evidence available) 12 12 Siberia Spoken in the central and southwestern river valleys of the Altay area in southern Siberia.
0199255911 2005 The World Atlas of Language Structures Bernard Comrie and David Gil and Martin Haspelmath and Matthew S. Dryer Oxford University Press New York 2005. "The World Atlas of Language Structures." edited by Bernard Comrie et al. Oxford University Press. 51.0,87.0
16 2009 Ethnologue: Languages of the World, 16th Edition (2009) M. Paul Lewis SIL International Dallas, TX http://www.ethnologue.com/ Lewis, M. Paul (ed.). 2009. Ethnologue: Languages of the World, 16 edn. http://www.ethnologue.com/home.asp. (15 February, 2011.) ll_pub 67,239 20,000 10000-99999 Data for the number of native speakers comes from (1993 J. Janhunen). Data for the ethnic population includes "Northern Altai [atv] but excluding 2,399 Talangits and 2,650 Teleuts, 2002 census." Vulnerable (20 percent certain, based on the evidence available) Russia;
3rd 2010 Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger UNESCO Publishing Paris http://www.unesco.org/culture/en/endangeredlanguages/atlas Christopher Moseley (ed.) Moseley, Christopher (ed.). 2010. Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger, 3rd edn. http://www.unesco.org/culture/en/endangeredlanguages/atlas. (03 June, 2011.) ll_pub 50,000 10000-99999 Vulnerable (20 percent certain, based on the evidence available) 51.069,86.5942
2000 UNESCO RED BOOK ON ENDANGERED LANGUAGES: NORTHEAST ASIA http://www.helsinki.fi/~tasalmin/nasia_report.html Juha Janhunen; Tapani Salminen Juha Janhunen; Tapani Salminen. 2000. "UNESCO RED BOOK ON ENDANGERED LANGUAGES: NORTHEAST ASIA." Online: http://www.helsinki.fi/~tasalmin/nasia_report.html 40,000 <20,000 1993 10000-99999 Russian Under increasing interference from Russian, the universal second language of the speakers; triggered by both social and ecological problems, there is, however, a current rise of nationalism, which may improve the position of the native language Threatened (80 percent certain, based on the evidence available) 12 12 Russia in the central and southwestern river valleys of the Altai region (Russian Altai), mainly within the Altai (Gorno-Altai) Republic, southern Siberia
World Oral Literature Project http://www.oralliterature.org "World Oral Literature Project." Online: http://www.oralliterature.org. 20,000 10000-99999 Vulnerable (20 percent certain, based on the evidence available)
9985-936922 The Red Book of the Peoples of the Russian Empire Andrew Humphreys and Krista Mits http://www.eki.ee/books/redbook "The Red Book of the Peoples of the Russian Empire." edited by Andrew Humphreys and Krista Mits. Online: http://www.eki.ee/books/redbook. 60,000 53,220 1979 10000-99999 Source: According to the 1959 census the Altaics numbered either 44,654 or 45,300 (according to different sources), 88.7 %% of whom were native speakers. According to the 1979 census data the total number of Altaics was approximately 60,000 of whom 50,203 lived in the autonomous region. Vulnerable (20 percent certain, based on the evidence available)
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