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Chandragupta II , also called Vikramaditya , powerful emperor (reigned c. 380– c. 415 ce ) of northern India . He was the son of Samudra Gupta and grandson of Chandragupta I . During his reign, art, architecture, and sculpture flourished, and the cultural development of ancient India reached its climax.

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According to tradition, Chandragupta II achieved power by assassinating a weak elder brother. Inheriting a large empire, he continued the policy of his father, Samudra Gupta, by extending control over neighbouring territories. From 388 to 409 he subjugated Gujarat , the region north of Bombay ( Mumbai ), Saurastra (now Saurashtra), in western India, and Malwa , with its capital at Ujjain . These territories were ruled by Shaka chiefs, whose ancestors were Scythian tribes from the regions around Lake Balkhash (Balqash) in Kazakhstan. To strengthen his southern flank, he arranged a marriage between his daughter Prabhavati and Rudrasena II, king of the Vakatakas . When Rudrasena died, Prabhavati acted as regent for her sons, thereby increasing Gupta influence in the south. The emperor may also have made a matrimonial alliance with a dynasty in Mysore. He is almost certainly the King Chandra eulogized in the Sanskrit inscription on the iron pillar in the Qūwat al-Islām mosque in Delhi .

A strong and vigorous ruler, Chandragupta II was well qualified to govern an extensive empire. Some of his silver coins bear the title Vikramaditya (“Sun of Valour”), which suggests that he was the prototype for the king Vikramaditya of later Hindu tradition. Although the emperor generally resided at Ayodhya , which he made his capital, the city of Pataliputra (now Patna in Bihar) also achieved prosperity and grandeur. A benevolent king under whom India enjoyed peace and relative prosperity, he also patronized learning; among the scholars at his court were the astronomer Varahamihira and the Sanskrit poet and dramatist Kalidasa . The Chinese Buddhist pilgrim Faxian , who spent six years (405–411) in India during Chandragupta II’s reign, spoke highly of the system of government, the means for dispensing charity and medicine (the emperor maintained free rest houses and hospitals), and the goodwill of the people. But he never visited the emperor or his court. Chandragupta II was a devout Hindu, but he also tolerated the Buddhist and Jain religions.

This article was most recently revised and updated by Erik Gregersen , Senior Editor.Learn More in these related Britannica articles:
India
India: The Guptas
…about 380 by his son Chandra Gupta II (reigned c. 380–c. 415), though there is some evidence that there may have been an intermediate ruler. Chandra Gupta II’s major campaign was against the Shaka rulers of Ujjain, the success of which was celebrated in a series of silver coins. Gupta…
Kalidasa
…court of the fabulous king Vikramaditya of Ujjain. Unfortunately, there are several known Vikramadityas (Sun of Valour—a common royal appellation); likewise, the nine distinguished courtiers could not have been contemporaries. It is certain only that the poet lived sometime between the reign of Agnimitra, the second Shunga king (
Gupta dynasty: empire in 4th century
Gupta dynasty
The empire’s third ruler, Chandra Gupta II (or Vikramaditya, “Sun of Valour”), was celebrated for extending the empire to Ujjain, but his reign became more associated with cultural and intellectual achievements than with military conquest. His successors—Kumara Gupta, Skanda Gupta, and others—saw the gradual demise of the empire with…
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