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Join Britannica's Publishing Partner Program and our community of experts to gain a global audience for your work! SHARE Facebook Twitter Home Health & Medicine Conditions & Diseases Infectious Diseases Pappataci feverpathologyWritten By: The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica Alternative Titles: phlebotomus fever, sand fly fever, sandfly fever, three-day fever

Pappataci fever , also called phlebotomus fever, three-day fever , or sandfly fever , acute , infectious, febrile disease caused by a phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae) and producing temporary incapacitation. It is transmitted to humans by the bloodsucking female sand fly (notably Phlebotomus papatasii , P. perniciosus , and P. perfiliewsi ) and is prevalent in the moist subtropical countries of the Eastern Hemisphere lying between latitude 20° and 45° N, particularly around the Mediterranean Sea , in the Middle East , and in parts of India . It breaks out in epidemic form during the summer season following sand fly breeding. Hosts may include warm- and cold-blooded vertebrates and possibly plants and thrips (tiny winged insects of the order Thysanoptera). The sand fly can become infected as a result of biting an infected person any time from 48 hours before until 24 hours after the onset of fever . Once it has been transmitted, the virus requires 7 to 10 days to incubate, after which the sand fly remains infected for life.

In human hosts, the virus multiplies and becomes widely disseminated throughout the body. Within two and one-half to five days after exposure, there is suddenly a feeling of lassitude, abdominal distress, and dizziness, followed within one day by a chilly sensation and a rapid rise in temperature during the next day or two to 102°–104.5° F (38.8°–40.3° C). As in dengue , symptoms include severe frontal headache and postorbital pain, intense muscular and joint pains, and a flushed appearance of the face but, unlike dengue, no true rash or subsequent scaling occurs. During the first day of fever the pulse is accelerated. Usually after two days the temperature slowly returns to normal; only rarely is there a second episode of fever. Following the febrile period, there is great fatigue and weakness, accompanied by slow pulse and frequently subnormal blood pressure . Convalescence may require a few days or several weeks, but the prognosis is always favourable. Treatment is entirely symptomatic.

Sand flies breed in vegetation within a few hundred feet of human habitations. However, these breeding places are difficult to discover, rendering larvicidal control impractical. The bloodsucking females feed only from sunset to sunrise and only at ground level, so that sleeping above the ground floor provides moderately good protection. Ordinary mosquito netting and screening are useless, because unfed female flies can pass through their 18-mesh squares. Insect repellents, such as dimethyl phthalate, when applied to exposed skin, will keep sand flies away for a few hours, but the use of insecticide sprays on verandas, on screens, around doors and windows, and within habitations will readily kill all adult sand flies that alight on the sprayed surfaces.

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